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How to Wear Infection Control PPE

PPE for Airborne HCIDs

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is only effective if it’s the right equipment used in the right way. The following instructions are only for airborne high consequence infectious diseases such as Wuhan Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). These instructions are not for contact HCIDs.

Putting on PPE

Before donning PPE, you should put on a lightweight base layer (or hospital scrubs if you have them), ensure hair is tied back securely and off the neck and collar, remove jewellery and pens, ensure you are hydrated, and perform hand hygiene.

You should wear the following PPE, put on in the following order:
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  1. Gown or coverall
  2. FFP3 respirator and fit check
  3. Eye protection (goggles, face shield or hood)
  4. Perform hand hygiene
  5. Disposable gloves

The order given above is practical but the order for putting on is less critical than the order of removal given below. During donning each item must be adjusted as required to ensure it fits correctly and interfaces well with other PPE items.

Removal of PPE

PPE should be removed in an order that minimises the potential for cross-contamination. Before leaving your quarantine area, gloves, gown and eye protection should be removed (in that order, where worn) and disposed of as biohazard waste. After leaving the area, the respirator can be removed and disposed of as biohazard waste.

The order of removal of PPE is suggested as follows, consistent with WHO guidance:

  1. Peel off gloves and dispose
  2. Perform hand hygiene
  3. Remove gown or coverall by using a peeling motion, fold gown in on itself and place in waste bin
  4. Perform hand hygiene
  5. Remove goggles or visor only by the headband or sides and dispose in clinical waste
  6. Perform hand hygiene
  7. Remove respirator from behind and dispose in clinical waste
  8. Perform hand hygiene